Have a Wonderful Labor Day Weekend!

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This Monday, September 2nd, we will be closed due to the Labor Day Holiday.  Enjoy the long weekend!  As always – be safe, happy, and healthy!

 

 

Posted By: Axiom Health Care Marketing

Sleep Deprived?

Credit: www.telegraph.co.uk

Credit: www.telegraph.co.uk

Read our latest ARTICLE on how sleep deprivation can cause serious health issues.  You are just a few lifestyle changes away from a healthier you.

 

 

 

Posted By: Axiom Health Care Marketing

Hit the Snooze Button

Credit: www.telegraph.co.uk

Credit: www.telegraph.co.uk

Many of us don’t realize the pressure we put on ourselves and the ones we care about.  In middle school, some parents put their children on amphetamine salts, such as Adderall, so they can get them into honors courses in high school.  In high school, we juggled extracurricular activities and academia so we could get into college.  In college, many have to work and pull all-nighters in order to boost our G.P.A. so we could get a decent job.  At work, we “willingly” agree to overtime so we could get a promotion.  We are rushing through life, replacing healthy essentials with processed foods, prescription medications, caffeine, and anything else that will bring us from point A to point B faster than the next person.  Where does it end?  Unfortunately, it ends with a large percentage of the population dealing with serious health complications due to sleep deprivation.

Neurological Health

Credit: www.stemgenex.com

Credit: www.stemgenex.com

Chronic sleep loss can damage our overall well-being by negatively impacting the brain.  When we sleep, we are giving our brain the opportunity to repair itself, which is the key to proper learning and memory retention.  When the average person begins to lose an excessive amount of sleep, it can weaken problem solving skills, creativity, and the ability to remain focused.  Ultimately, those who are sleep deficient may have mood swings, problems with impulse and anger, as well as, depression and motivational issues.  Ironically, many students think it is more efficient to cram information into our heads in place of getting a good night of sleep.

Immune Function

It only makes sense that when your doctor tells you to get plenty of rest when you are ill, to at least get an average amount to stay well, right?  Your immune system also relies on sleep in order for it to function properly.  We are taking away our ability to combat disease by suppressing the actions of our killer T-cells when we lose too much sleep.  Recent studies have also found that maintaining a healthy sleep schedule may also fight cancer.

Weight Gain

Chronic sleep deprivation negatively modifies our metabolism.  According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, “Sleep helps maintain a healthy balance of the hormones that make you feel hungry (ghrelin) or full (leptin). When you don’t get enough sleep, your level of ghrelin goes up and your level of leptin goes down. This makes you feel hungrier than when you’re well-rested.”   Ultimately, it has been found that there is an increased risk with becoming obese with each hour of sleep lost per night, on average.

Heart Disease

Serious sleep disorders have been linked to hypertension, irregular heartbeat, imbalanced stress hormones, and other cardiovascular diseases.  According to a report in the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers at the University of Chicago claim that, “too little sleep can promote calcium buildup in the heart arteries, leading to the plaques that can then break apart and cause heart attacks and strokes.”  In addition, our blood pressure decreases when we sleep; therefore, we are putting our bodies at risk of incessant high blood pressure when we force ourselves to stay awake.

Where to Begin? 

While it is difficult to completely change bad sleep habits over-night, we can at least start by making simple lifestyle changes.

Credit: www.sheknows.com

Credit: www.sheknows.com

Reduce Caffeine Intake.

Most of us have a cup of coffee before work every morning, some of us have two, maybe even three by the end of the day.  No big deal, right?  Well, what about the additional cup of tea, chocolate bar, soda, or occasional energy drink?  All of these products contain caffeine, which as all know, is a stimulant.  While mainstream media encourages you to buy the latest energy drink, in addition to promoting alleged health benefits from drinking coffee, we tend to lose site of the term “in moderation.” A study conducted in 2002 at Duke University found that, “The effects of coffee drinking are long-lasting and exaggerate the stress response both in terms of the body’s physiological response in blood pressure elevations and stress hormone levels.” Lack of sleep is already dabbling with your hormones and blood pressure; submitting yourself to excessive amounts of caffeine can add to those health issues while taking a toll on your physical appearance and increasing anxiety levels.

Keep your Diet in Check

When we are drained from constantly rushing and working, we sometimes forget to eat properly.  We end up reducing ourselves to processed meat, lack of vegetables, and items on the “healthy” menu at fast food chains.  Start by reserving Sunday nights for family and friends; take the time to make a balanced home cooked meal.

Chronic sleep loss can damage our overall health-wellness by negatively impacting our weight, cardiovascular health, neurological functioning, and immune system.  Most importantly, lack of restful sleep results in increased levels of inflammation, which is the underlying cause of many of our current chronic illnesses.  Sleep loss education, healthy role models, and proper medical information could change the way the next generation of students and professionals maintain a healthy balance between well-being and the pressure to succeed.  Relax every once in a while – Hit the snooze button.

References:

“Caffeine’s Effects Are Long-Lasting and Compound Stress.” DukeHealth.org. Duke Medicine News and Communications, n.d. Web. 15 Aug. 2013. <http://www.dukehealth.org/health_library/news/5687>.

“Importance of Sleep : Six Reasons Not to Scrimp on Sleep.” Harvard Medical School. Harvard Health Publications, Jan. 2006. Web. 15 Aug. 2013. <http://www.health.harvard.edu/press_releases/importance_of_sleep_and_health>.

Park, Alice. “Lack of Sleep Linked to Heart Problems.” Health & Family. Time, 23 Dec. 2008. Web. 15 Aug. 2013. <http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1868406,00.html>.

“Why Is Sleep Important?” NHLBI, NIH. U.S. Dept of Health & Human Services, 22 Feb. 2012. Web. 15 Aug. 2013. <http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sdd/why.html>.

Posted By: Axiom Health Care Marketing

 

Live Longer, Healthier, and Leaner by going Vegetarian

blueberries_on_plantGiving up meat doesn’t sound too appetizing to some people, but the results are well worth it – if it’s done right.  Enjoy nature’s best, and start eating more of what your body craves.  Find out what researchers are saying when it comes to combating cardiovascular disease, losing weight, and elongating your lifespan with a vegetarian lifestyle.

 

Posted By: Axiom Health Care Marketing

Combat Anxiety and Depression with Acupuncture

acupunture

Acupuncture is yet another way to treat various health conditions – without a prescription.  Learn more by reading this ARTICLE

Posted by: Axiom Health Care Marketing

Balancing your Health with Yoga

Credit: www.yogahale.com

Credit: www.yogahale.com

Most of us wake up, brew coffee, saunter to our car, drink coffee, drink more coffee, eat something cheap and fast for lunch, drink more coffee, finish work, drive home, wait in traffic, become frustrated, finally get home, eat something cheap and fast for dinner, watch television, and go to bed.  Every.Single.Day.  We are putting our bodies and minds under constant stress by refusing to deviate away from our humdrum, static lifestyles.  We begin to throw off our natural equilibrium, which puts our health and wellness at stake.  As time goes on, illnesses and chemical imbalances start to set in, and instead of finding the root cause of why our bodies are breaking down, we settle for pain killers and mood stabilizers to make us “feel better.”   Sound familiar??  How about we recognize that we are killing ourselves and try to take some control over our health and well-being?

Yoga therapy is a form of integrative medicine that combines holistic and modern approaches to healing, by first discovering the source of the problem.  Reestablishing the balance and communication between mind, body, and spirit is a foundation in yoga therapy.

Getting to the Root of Yoga Therapy

The word Yoga is a derivative of the Sanskrit word yug, which means to “to bind closely,” “join,” “concentrate,” and “to bring under yoke.”   This unity is based off of one’s own web of homeostasis, binding mind, body, and soul, and the “individual self, uniting with Cosmic Consciousness or the Universal Spirit” (MedIndia).

A crossed legged yoga posture carved by the Indus civilization http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga

A crossed legged yoga posture carved by the Indus civilization
Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoga

Scholars and archaeologists have been striving for over a century to pinpoint the detailed origin of yoga.  Soapstone seals with yogi-like depictions were unearthed in the 1920s in the ruins of Harappa and Mohenjo Daro, where the largest society in early antiquity, the Indus civilization, flourished.  These carvings are dated back to 3000 B.C.E., hence the revolutionary discovery that Yoga originated in India over 5,000 years ago.  By way of the Vedas, Hindus brought yoga to modern times, where it is now being practiced by over 20 million Americans.

 

The Koshas: The intertwining layers that make up our physical, mental, and spiritual self

Beginning with the outermost layer, we find our way to the Atman, or true self, by moving through and beyond each kosha.

Credit goes to SwamiJ.com

Credit: SwamiJ.com

Annamaya kosha- Physical: This is the “food” sheath.  This layer is how we could describe the visible, or physical, appearance of our entity. It is made up of our integumentary, skeletal, muscular system, and other organs that provide our corporeal makeup.  We must nurture this outmost layer of ourselves and explore it during meditation and train ourselves to go move inward toward our True Self.

 Pranamaya kosha- Energy: This is the “breath” sheath.   The elusive ambiances relating to breath is the driving force that allows our body to operate. By way of energy channels (nadis) in our body, this kosha allows our inner self to function in the physical world, or the external world, giving our still consciousness the appearance of a moving human body.  It is important to train and regulate the Pranamaya kosha in order for this level to flow efficiently.

 Manamaya kosha- Mental:  The “lower mind.” Within this level, we process our dynamic emotions and feelings.  It directs the thoughts that are created by our physical senses. It is not in control processing deeper awareness, and thus it can create illusions and qualms.  It receives instruction from deeper levels, and its ability to function is dulled if it is clouded by illusions from the Mental kosha.

 Vijnanamaya kosha-Wisdom: The “higher mind.”  This level embraces higher levels of consciousness.   This kosha does not just think, it is ego consciousness.  It has a sense of self, giving it the power of decision, judgement, and knowledge.  It maintains positive strength when it is not confused with memories and dulled by the illusions from the Mental layer.

 Anandamaya kosha – Bliss: It is the innermost kosha that surrounds the Atman or the self, which is the everlasting, conscious core.  It is outside of the mind, where we are separated from stimuli that cause a blissful reaction.  It is a being of love, joy, and peace on its own.

Now that we understand how complex the dimensions of our existence is under yogic ideals and philosophies, it changes how we approach treatment.  Without knowing the source of the illness or problem, we are limiting ourselves to partial healing.  Regain homeostasis and well-being. Find out more about Integrative approaches to healing by Dr. Jorge Bordenave at  http://www.miamiintegrativemedicine.com/

References:

Bharati, Swami J. “Koshas or Sheaths of Yoga Vedanta.” SwamiJ.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Aug. 2013. <http://www.swamij.com/koshas.htm>.

Feuerstein, Georg. “A Short History of Yoga.” Swamijcom., n.d. Web. 04 Aug. 2013. <http://www.swamij.com/history-yoga.htm>.

Kessler, Jody. “The 5 Koshas.” Singing Heart Yoga. N.p., 31 May 2011. Web. 04 Aug. 2013. <http://singingheartyoga.blogspot.com/2011/05/5-koshas.html>.

“Origin of Yoga.” MedIndia. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Aug. 2013. <http://www.medindia.net/yoga-lifestyle/yoga-orgin.htm#ixzz2b5BqpMyi>.

Posted by: Axiom Health Care Marketing

 

Understanding the Cause of a Health Issue Could Begin with a Simple Diet Change

healthy foods

Improving your physical and mental health, by the Integrative Medicine Approach, starts with what you eat.

Read more in this ARTICLE